Scripps College Housing Options

On-Campus Housing Options:

Scripps Residential Life houses students Scripps College is home to nine unique residence halls. Click here for more information on on-campus housing options.

Off-Campus-Housing Options:

Scripps Residential Life also offers several housing options off campus, which include spaces at College Park Apartments, Padua Terrace Apartments, Scripps Owned Houses, and at Smiley Hall at Pomona College. Click here for more information on off-campus housing options.

 

Grace Scripps Clark Hall

Grace Scripps Clark Hall

Grace Scripps Clark Hall

Grace Scripps Clark Hall was one of the first residence halls built, and remains one of the most popular today. The building features a high-ceilinged baronial dining room, inner courtyards and balconies, and the mosaic-paved Olive Court, which externally joins Clark Hall to Toll Hall. Completed in the fall of 1928, Clark was a joint gift of Mrs. Rex B. Clark (Grace Scripps Clark) and Miss Ellen Browning Scripps in memory of Mr. James E. Scripps, who was brother of the donors.

Hall Facts

  • Dedicated in 1928
  • Houses 115 student

Hall Amenities:

  • Formal living room with piano
  • Living room with television
  • 2 Kitchens, one on each floor with stove, refrigerator, and sink
  • Laundry room
  • Computer lab
  • Browsing room
  • Basement storage
  • 2 Courtyards

Eleanor Joy Toll Hall

EJT

Eleanor Joy Toll Hall

Eleanor Joy Toll Hall, a gift of Ellen Browning Scripps, is the first residence hall constructed on campus. It is named for Eleanor Joy Toll, the first woman trustee and prominent leader of women’s interests, such as music education, and civic progress, in Southern California.

Hall Facts

  • Dedicated in 1927
  • Houses 90 students

Hall Amenities

  • Formal living room with piano
  • Living room with television
  • 2 Kitchens, one on each floor with stove, refrigerator, and sink
  • Laundry room
  • Computer lab
  • Browsing room
  • Basement storage
  • Sycamore courtyard and Star courtyard
  • Abuts to Scripps rose garden

Ellen Browning Hall

Ellen Browning Hall

Ellen Browning Hall

Browning Hall, named for Ellen Browning Scripps, founder of Scripps College, opened in the Fall of 1929. Manana Courtyard is full of plants native to Mexico and Turtle court features an exterior staircase up to the third floor and Browning bell tower.

History/Namesake

Although she did not wish to have a building named after her, Ellen Browning Hall bares the first two names of Miss Scripps, and is dedicated to the memory of her brother, Edward W. Scripps.

Hall Facts

  • Dedicated in 1929
  • Houses 85 students

Hall Amenities

  • Formal living room with piano
  • Living room with television
  • 2 Kitchens, one on each floor with stove, refrigerator, and sink
  • Laundry room
  • Computer lab
  • Browsing room
  • Basement storage
  • Manana courtyard
  • Turtle courtyard
  • Abuts to the Scripps student garden and Scripps rose garden
  • Browning tower

Susan Miller Dorsey Hall

Susan Miller Dorsey Hall

Susan Miller Dorsey Hall

Susan Miller Dorsey Hall was built in 1930 and remained the youngest residence hall for thirty years thereafter. Financed almost entirely by women (Miss Scripps, Mrs. Margaret Fowler, Mrs. Edward C. Harwood, Mrs. Mark Kimberly Shirk, Mrs. Paul Jordan Smith, Mrs. Charles Stinchfeld, Mrs. James Luckie and Mr. Jacob Chandler Harper), the hall is named for Mrs. Dorsey, who was the first woman superintendent of schools in Los Angeles and one of the first trustees selected.

Hall Facts

  • Dedicated in 1930
  • Houses 70 students

Hall Amenities

  • Formal living room with piano
  • Living room with television
  • 2 Kitchens, one on each floor with stove, refrigerator, and sink
  • Laundry room
  • Computer lab
  • Browsing room
  • Basement storage
  • 2 Courtyards

Cecil & Bessie Bartlett Frankel Hall

Frankel Hall

Cecil & Bessie Bartlett Frankel Hall

Frankel Hall, built in the spring of 1966, to accommodate expansion of Scripps from 300 to 500 students. Frankel Hall is named for Los Angeles residents Cecil Frankel and Bessie Bartlett Frankel, an honorary alumna of the College since 1931.

Hall Facts

  • Dedicated in 1966
  • Houses 80 students

Hall Amenities

  • Formal living room with piano
  • 1 Kitchen/living room, with stove, refrigerator, sink, and television
  • Laundry room
  • Computer lab
  • Browsing room

Mary Routt Hall

Mary Routt Hall

Mary Routt Hall

Routt Hall, built in the spring of 1966, to accommodate expansion from 300 to 500 students.  Routt Hall is named for journalist and philanthropist Mary Patterson Routt, a founding trustee of the College.

Hall Facts

  • Dedicated in 1966
  • Houses 80 students

 Hall Amenities

  • Formal living room with piano
  • 1 Kitchen/living room, with stove, refrigerator, sink, and television
  • Laundry room
  • Computer lab
  • Browsing room
  • Basement storage

Gabriele Jungels-Winkler Hall

Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Hall

Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Hall

Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Hall opened in the fall of 2000. Named for the alumnae Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler ’72 of London, who provided key guidance to architects on this project in addition to supporting student scholarship programs, an endowed faculty chair in contemporary European studies, a lecture series at the European Union Center of California and other academic programs.

Hall Facts

  • Dedicated in 2000
  • Houses 86 students

Hall Amenities

  • Formal living room with piano
  • Recreation room with television
  • 2 Kitchens, one on the first and second floors with stove, refrigerator, and sink
  • Laundry room
  • Computer lab
  • Browsing room
  • Basement storage
  • One courtyard

Mary Kimberly Hall and Wilbur Hall

Mary Kimberly Hall and Wilbur Hall

Mary Kimberly Hall and Wilbur Hall

Kimberly Hall opened to students in 1960 and is the fifth residence hall built on campus. Funded in part by gifts from friends and the trustees of Harvey Mudd College, whose women students were housed in Kimberly from the 60s through the 80s. The hall honors Mary Kimberly Shirk of Redlands, a longtime trustee (1926-1966) and interim president of Scripps College from 1942-44. In summer of 2000, the connecting Wilbur Dining Hall was renovated to house 25 additional students.

Hall Facts

  • Dedicated in 1960
  • Houses 75 students

Hall Amenities

  • Formal living room with piano
  • 1 Kitchen/living room, with stove, refrigerator, sink, and television
  • Laundry room
  • Computer lab
  • Browsing room
  • Basement storage