Disability Support Services

Rights and Responsibilities

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 prohibit discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities. Academic Resources and Services (ARS) is responsible for coordinating disability support services for students, with other College departments assisting in the provision of accommodations for students.

“Qualified” with respect to postsecondary educational services means “a person who meets the academic and technical standards requisite to admission or participation in the education program or activity, with or without reasonable modifications to rules, policies or practices; the removal of architectural, communication or transportation barriers; or the provision of auxiliary aids and services.”

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Self-Identification
Identify yourself as a student who is requesting accommodations for a disability by contacting Academic Resources and Services, and provide professional verification of your disability.

Right of Refusal
You have the right to refuse any accommodation offered, and you accept the responsibility for any consequences of such decisions — you are not required to register with Academic Resources and Services, identify yourself as having a disability, or accept any accommodations you do not need or want.

Faculty/Staff Communication
Students are responsible for discussing their approved accommodations with each instructor and/or staff member during a meeting or office hours. Students are responsible for clarifying and planning their accommodations with staff members and/or each of their individual instructors. Notify Academic Resources and Services of any difficulties in securing needed accommodations.

Non-Academic Events
For non-academic events such as commencement or orientation, contact the office sponsoring the event to schedule or cancel accommodations.

Recorded Lectures
Students are responsible for notifying the lecturer that they will be recording material for their sole use as it pertains to independent study. Students working with our office will be given a Recorded Lecture Agreement Form and will need to meet with their instructor to work through the form. Students are expected to use the material for their own studying and note-taking process and are not to share the recordings with others.

Proctored Exams
Submit the online Proctored Exam Request Form at least seven days prior to the testing date, with consent of your instructor. Failure to do so may result in the inability of ARS to proctor your exam.

Note-Taking
Requests for a course note-taker are managed by Academic Resources and Services. Requests should be made as early as possible at the beginning of each semester. Requests for note-takers will be processed only after a student has formalized accommodations for the semester.

Know the deadlines, assignments, and other course information delivered in lecture or in the syllabus, regardless of whether the information is in the notes. We recommend that you check over the notes you receive, in case you have any questions or require clarification.

Accommodations Information

Eligibility
Individuals with a condition that rises to the level of a disability are entitled to reasonable accommodations. The Americans with Disabilities Act defines disability as “with respect to an individual: (A) a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of such individual; (B) a record of such an impairment; or (C) being regarded as having such an impairment” (42 U.S.C. § 12102(2)). Disabilities may include, but are not limited to, learning differences or disabilities, physical and mobility impairments, sensory impairments, psychological disorders, and/or chronic health impairments. Note: Having received accommodations in high school through an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a 504 plan does not automatically make a student eligible for services in college. The student must register for services and provide supporting documentation for review; IEPs are not acceptable forms of documentation. If it is determined that a student is eligible to receive accommodations, the recommended accommodations may be different from those the student received in high school.

Academic Accommodations

Request Process
If a student wishes to formalize disability support services, the student must self-identify needs for accommodations in advance with Academic Resources and Services.

The student must submit a completed Request for Disability Support Services Form along with current documentation establishing that the student has a disability as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (see the Documentation section below for further details). It is recommended that the student submit the request form and documentation after acceptance of admission to Scripps but prior to the first semester so that appropriate accommodations can be in place at the beginning of the college career.

The request form and documentation will be reviewed and the student will be notified if the documentation is acceptable and complete, or if further information is required. Once eligibility is established, the student will be notified in writing of the approved accommodation(s). If the student would like to meet with a staff member to discuss approved accommodation(s), please contact ars@scrippscollege.edu to schedule an appointment.

While a student may register for disability support services and request accommodations after the school year has started, accommodations may not be immediately available because the support services staff will need to receive and review documentation. A student may request accommodations at any point in a semester; however, accommodations cannot be applied retroactively.

To submit a completed Request for Disability Support Services Form and documentation:

  • By email: ars@scrippscollege.edu
  • By fax: (909) 607-7081
    Attention: Academic Resources and Services
  • By mail:
    Scripps College
    1030 Columbia Ave., #2010
    Claremont, CA 91711
    Attention: Dean of Students Office (Balch Hall)

Examples of Accommodations

  • Note-taking assistance
  • Extended time on exams
  • Proctored exams
  • Distraction-reduced testing environment
  • Early access to requisite readings
  • Priority registration
  • Breaks
  • Extensions on assignments
  • Assistive technology
  • Use of a word processor
  • Alternate format for requisite readings
  • Part-time enrollment
  • Use of a calculator

The College does not provide services of a personal nature (such as attendants, caretakers, homework assistance, or tutors), typing services, or prescriptive aids such as eyeglasses or hearing aids, nor does it provide diagnostic evaluations of disabilities.

Unreasonable accommodations would include those that impose an undue economic or administrative burden on the College or would fundamentally alter the academic program or lower the standards of the College (e.g., waiver of essential course requirements, attendance, etc.).

Documentation

In order to establish eligibility for accommodations, the student must provide documentation identifying that the condition substantially limits performance in one or more major life activities.

The student with a disability is the best source of information regarding necessary accommodations. In postsecondary settings, it is the student’s responsibility to request disability-related accommodations. In most circumstances, the College will not accept documentation that purports to state that a parent or family member is the student’s treating healthcare professional or an expert retained to assess the student’s disability. In the event that a parent or family member is serving in such capacity consistent with the ethical guidelines of mental or medical healthcare professionals, the documentation should state such. Appropriate documentation must be provided by the treating healthcare professional on letterhead and should address the following guidelines:

  • Licensure and experience of health care professional
  • A specific diagnosis of limitations
  • A description of how the diagnosis was reached, methods and procedures, test results and evaluation of test results
  • A description of the specific changes that have occurred since the original report and recommendations were made that indicates a need to adjust accommodations as originally made
  • What and how any major life activities are limited by the impairment
  • How the disability causes any academic difficulties
  • A list of any and all accommodations that might be needed to facilitate the student’s participation in the academic program